Tag: fish

Opinion | Who does Alabama’s environmental watchdog work for? Not you. – al.com

Because as LeFleur and ADEM have shown again and again, these people aren’t people at all, but rather the industries that make it unsafe for real people to live.

If there’s one thing that people across the political spectrum can agree on, it’s this: When a granddad takes his grandchildren to fish in the river, when they catch a fish, they should be able to eat that fish without worry of impairing the little ones’ brain development.

That won’t be a problem on the Mulberry Fork. For a while, at least, there won’t be any fish there to catch.

And it’s not just the fish, either. It’s the water. The water we play in. The water we drink.

via Who does Alabama’s environmental watchdog work for? Not you. – al.com

Opinion | When will Alabama dare defend herself? – al.com

Tyson bought American Proteins for a reported $850 million last year, when the chicken giant brought in $40 billion in revenue – the gross domestic product of the entire country of Jordan.

If Tyson were fined a million dollars it would add up to .003 percent of its income – the equivalent of a cup of coffee for a guy who makes $100,000 a year. Nothing.

via When will Alabama dare defend herself? – al.com

Tyson Foods facing lawsuit over fish kill

The Sipsey Heritage Commission announced Tuesday they’ll be suing Tyson Foods for “the assault” on the Black Warrior River.

via Tyson Foods facing lawsuit over fish kill

Estimated 175,000 fish killed in Black Warrior River after huge wastewater spill | WBMA

Chris Greene with the state fisheries department says their conservative estimate is that 175,000 fish were killed.

He called the incident “significant” and said it will take some time to replenish the river.

Locals are calling on Tyson Foods, which owns the company that spilled this waste water, to clean up their operations.

via Estimated 175,000 fish killed in Black Warrior River after huge wastewater spill | WBMA

Massive fish kill in Cullman County due to wastewater spill

The Mulberry Fork has experienced a massive fish kill over the past few days. Tyson Foods’ River Valley ingredients plant had a large wastewater spill on Thursday, leaving residents to find hundreds of dead fish floating downstream.

via Massive fish kill in Cullman County due to wastewater spill

Tyson spill; public encouraged to avoid Dave Young Creek, Mulberry Fork | The Cullman Tribune

American Proteins had a large wastewater spill (undisclosed amount) sometime yesterday, which caused a massive fish kill. The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources’ Division of Wildlife & Freshwater Fisheries (DCNR) and the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) are conducting an investigation into the wastewater spill and resulting fish kill today. Unfortunately, everyone should avoid contact with the Mulberry Fork downstream until further notice.

American Proteins [1170 Co. Rd. 508 | Hanceville, AL 35077 (256) 352-9821)], which they say is the largest rendering plant in the world, is now owned by Tyson. The sprawling plant receives chicken carcasses from slaughterhouses across Alabama and cooks them down into protein products. This facility has a history of spills and fish kills due to poor housekeeping and maintenance.

via Tyson spill; public encouraged to avoid Dave Young Creek, Mulberry Fork | The Cullman Tribune

Advisory Board Approves Flounder, Seatrout Changes | Outdoor Alabama

The length and bag limits of two of Alabama’s most popular inshore fish species will likely change soon after proposals by the Alabama Marine Resources Division were approved last weekend by the Alabama Conservation Advisory Board.

Under the new regulations, spotted seatrout (speckled trout) and southern flounder will have reduced bag limits to deal with concerns that the species are not able to sustain healthy populations.

via Advisory Board Approves Flounder, Seatrout Changes | Outdoor Alabama

Hooking Redeye Bass Highlights Scenic Trip Down the Tallapoosa | Outdoor Alabama

“East and northeast Alabama have a lot of great places to fish, especially the redeye bass,” he said. “Redeye bass are endemic to Alabama, which means they don’t live anywhere else. These fish like current in cool Piedmont streams with a lot of flow. They like clean water. This river is so clean, and it has so much oxygen in the water that these fish live in the shoals on this big river.

“Redeye bass are our own version of trout fishing, but I think it’s cooler than that because the redeyes are native. They are colorful, very aggressive and eager to eat. I think this is something really special for Alabama to have in our waters.”

via Hooking Redeye Bass Highlights Scenic Trip Down the Tallapoosa | Outdoor Alabama

Greed and wanton destruction destroyed Alabama’s oyster harvest – al.com

It is hard to imagine how many oysters were present in Mobile Bay before we got here. It is hard, even, to understand how many there were just 100 years ago. According to AL.com calculations, it is likely we have removed about 1.8 billion adult oysters from the bay in the last century.

via Greed and wanton destruction destroyed Alabama’s oyster harvest – al.com

Here’s Who’s Been Dumping Toxic Waste in the Coosa – Coosa Riverkeeper

Did you know that nearly one million pounds of toxic chemicals are dumped into the Coosa River each year? Nearly 95% of that waste comes from two Koch Foods chicken processing plants near Gadsden in the form of nitrate compounds. Excessive nitrogen pollution stimulates the growth of aquatic plants, weeds and algae, which fishermen and lake goers alike know grow in excess on Coosa River lakes. Too much nitrogen in drinking water can also be harmful to young children and livestock.

When looking at the most harmful chemicals though, the Gaston Steam Plant in Wilsonville and the Resolute Forest Products Coosa Pines paper mill in Childersburg outpace others. In fact, Alabama Power’s Gaston Steam Plant released three times as much developmental toxins to the river, at 473 pounds, as all the other facilities in the basin combined.

via Here’s Who’s Been Dumping Toxic Waste in the Coosa – Coosa Riverkeeper

Kingpins of the Gulf make millions off red snapper harvest without ever going fishing – al.com

A little-known federal program has turned dozens of Gulf of Mexico fishermen into the lords of the sea — able to earn millions annually without even going fishing — and transformed dozens more into modern-day serfs who must pay the lords for the right to harvest red snapper.

via Kingpins of the Gulf make millions off red snapper harvest without ever going fishing – al.com