Tag: community

Nearly 150 geese euthanized in Montgomery over health concerns | WHNT.com

Nearly 150 Canada geese have been removed and euthanized from a suburban Montgomery community after complaints about goose feces raised health concerns, officials said.

Tanya Espinosa, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Department of Agriculture told WSFA-TV that the agency removed 148 geese from a residential community in Pike Road and “humanely euthanized them.”

The department’s Wildlife Services helps managed damage related to Canada geese. Espinosa said under Alabama law it was not possible to relocate the geese instead of euthanizing them.

via Nearly 150 geese euthanized in Montgomery over health concerns | WHNT.com

Florence shows one way to bring recycling to rural Alabama – al.com

Florence used to use snow shovels to move recyclables around on an old conveyor belt the city got from the post office. Not anymore.

Now it’s probably the best model out there for how to bring recycling to rural areas in Alabama where sending a truck down every dirt road is not a realistic option.

via Florence shows one way to bring recycling to rural Alabama – al.com

Solar Power Users, Utility At Odds Over Backup Fee : NPR

Because of the fee, 65-year-old Thorne says it’ll take almost two decades to pay back her panels.

“Yes,” she says and laughs, “I may not be alive.”

Green energy groups say this solar fee is a key reason why, according to Wood Mackenzie and the Solar Energy Industries Association, Alabama comes in 48th out of 50 states in residential solar capacity. (North Dakota and South Dakota trail Alabama).

via Solar Power Users, Utility At Odds Over Backup Fee : NPR

Alabama Historians: The Last Known Slave Ship Has Been Found – The New York Times

The discovery was aided by input from the Smithsonian Institution, the National Park Service, the National Geographic Society and the Slave Wrecks Project, a multinational group researching the slave trade, and comes at a moment when civil rights museums have opened across the South. African-American history is also finding powerful new expression in the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which opened in Washington in 2016.

But the news is likely to resonate most forcefully in Africatown, a working-class community of about 2,000 people north of downtown Mobile. It was founded by people who had been transported to Alabama in the Clotilda’s hull, and it was a place where African languages were spoken for decades.

via Alabama Historians: The Last Known Slave Ship Has Been Found – The New York Times

In Africatown, the found ship Clotilda ignites hope, validates heritage – al.com

“It lends credibility to the community and to who we are as not just West Africans, but we are North Africans and West Africans and part of a human story, not a human tragedy.”

via In Africatown, the found ship Clotilda ignites hope, validates heritage – al.com

Clotilda, ‘last American slave ship,’ discovered in Alabama – National Geographic

“The discovery of the Clotilda sheds new light on a lost chapter of American history,” says Fredrik Hiebert, archaeologist-in-residence at the National Geographic Society, which supported the search. “This finding is also a critical piece of the story of Africatown, which was built by the resilient descendants of America’s last slave ship.”

via Clotilda, ‘last American slave ship,’ discovered in Alabama

What is the Clotilda? Last American slave ship found in Alabama; What it means, what happens now – al.com

The wreckage of the Clotilda – the last known ship to bring enslaved people from Africa to the U.S. – has been found in the waters off Mobile, a discovery that provided proof of what some had deemed a legend.

via What is the Clotilda? Last American slave ship found in Alabama; What it means, what happens now – al.com

Opening the Cahaba to More Active Tourism – Over the Mountain Journal

The Cahaba Blueway has dedicated 10 new canoe and kayak launching sites and swimming access points along the Cahaba River in Mountain Brook, Irondale, Trussville and other locations.

“The Cahaba River has always been a recreational outlet in our community, but you have to be a local person who is familiar with the area to know where those access points are,” said Brian Rushing, program coordinator for the Cahaba Blueway.

In efforts to heighten awareness of the river as an outstanding recreation- al asset for tourism, the Cahaba Blueway Society partnered with the University of Alabama Center for Economic Development to provide new infrastructure and information outlets.

via Opening the Cahaba to More Active Tourism – Over the Mountain Journal

Alabama Tornado Devastation in Photos – The Atlantic

On March 3, a tornado outbreak struck several southern states in the U.S., including Alabama, where a monster of a tornado reached estimated wind speeds of 170 mph. It left a path of destruction more than 20 miles long in Lee County, killing 23 people and injuring at least 100 others. In the days since, survivors have been picking through the pieces of their homes, recovering what they can, as they try to determine their next steps.

via Alabama Tornado Devastation in Photos – The Atlantic

Birmingham City Council applauded for opposition to Cahaba Beach Road project | Southern Environmental Law Center

Last week, the Birmingham City Council unanimously passed a resolution to oppose Cahaba Beach Road, a proposed project which would allow the Alabama Department of Transportation to build a road and bridge through the heart of an undeveloped area that safeguards Birmingham’s drinking water.

Along with numerous conservation organizations, local communities and elected officials, SELC and partners Cahaba River Society and Cahaba Riverkeeper have expressed serious concerns about the project’s harm to drinking water quality for the Birmingham region.

via Birmingham City Council applauded for opposition to Cahaba Beach Road project | Southern Environmental Law Center

Elaina Plott: The Bullet in My Arm – The Atlantic

Where I’m from, we like guns. They are as much a part of our story as Jesus, “Roll Tide,” and monograms. Even if you’ve never shot one, you appreciate the romance.

via Elaina Plott: The Bullet in My Arm – The Atlantic

Alabama’s long-awaited water report signals progress toward a statewide plan | Southern Environmental Law Center

Lagging behind neighboring states for decades, Alabama has gone through multiple droughts without a water management plan to help conserve water and protect the state’s rivers and streams during times of scarcity. The lack of a plan also puts Alabama at a disadvantage as the state navigates through competing water demands.

After years of advocating for a comprehensive plan and participating in the AWAWG focus panels, SELC and Alabama Rivers Alliance have been anxiously awaiting the release of the report to help inform leadership at the state level and provide guidelines for good water stewardship and protection. But discernable progress toward a plan has been slow, and appeared to be further hindered when the current governor announced plans to disband the AWAWG late last year. Governor Kay Ivey’s decision put the responsibility of developing a plan back on the Alabama Office of Water Resources and the Alabama Water Resources Commission.

via Alabama’s long-awaited water report signals progress toward a statewide plan | Southern Environmental Law Center

Analysis: Network Use Charges for Rooftop Solar | Solar Works

Alabama Power currently imposes a $5 per kilowatt monthly “capacity reserve charge” on solar and other types of distributed generation. This charge affects not only rooftop solar and residential customers, but also small businesses and schools who rely in part on solar installations to offset the energy they consume and buy from Alabama Power.

This particular fixed charge for rooftop solar not only unfairly burdens Alabama Power customers who install rooftop solar, but also reduces up to 50 percent of the savings customers could enjoy by going solar. Similar, prohibitive fixed charges for rooftop solar have been proposed, approved or rejected across the U.S. To add insult to injury, the Alabama Public Service Commission’s (PSC) approved the Alabama Power fixed charge in January 2013 without any public input or justification.

via Analysis: Network Use Charges for Rooftop Solar | Solar Works

A matter of life and death: Saving Alabama’s rural hospitals – al.com

Our rural hospital closure crisis is not just a health crisis, but an economic one as well. In many rural communities, the relationship between the existence of a hospital and economic development is critical to the overall success of the community. When the only hospital in a county closes or doesn’t exist, it becomes nearly impossible to attract and maintain industry, jobs, and people. Public health is compromised. For example, a Tuberculosis outbreak has plagued the citizens of Perry County since 2014. The infection rate there is 100 times the national average and higher than rates in India, Kenya, and Haiti. Further, as we’ve seen in recent international news reports, the rates of hookworm in Lowndes County are appalling and shameful at 33 percent due in part to the inadequate wastewater infrastructure there.

via A matter of life and death: Saving Alabama’s rural hospitals – al.com